Uprooted

I haven’t been posting as often as I like, because while I see a lot of Multimedia out there, I don’t always see a lot of good multimedia. And then sometimes I see something that just grabs the foundations and shakes it all up like a rag doll in a pit bulls mouth.

Chew it all up, spit it, change the game.

Dai Sugano of the Mercury News, along with reporter Julie Patel, worked on Uprooted for six months. Examining how land use in the Bay Area has effected the residents of a mobile home park in Sunnyvale from their struggle to stay to the aftermath of relocation as developers take over.

Uprooted

The piece is as moving as it is innovative and for storytellers like us, it makes us reexamine just what effective multimedia can be.

As Dai has shown, there is no formula.

This is without a doubt the most cinematic piece I’ve seen anyone do, anywhere! (Seriously, I’m convinced Dai is ready for Sundance.)

And on my personal list it ranks number two, right behind The Star’s Noir-inspired piece on the Conrad Black trial, as my all-time favorite multimedia piece.

Dai took a brief timeout from partying with his son to say: “I don’t know if you have seen it in the paper. My 6-month project on two mobile home families finally ran last Sunday. UPROOTED. When you have time, please check it out.”

Don’t ever let it be said that the man talks to much.

-Shaminder

[Ratings]

6 comments

  1. It has never been reinforced better: it’s not what you say, rather it’s how you say it. In this case, what was said and how it was said complimented one another wonderfully. Simply luscious…

  2. The best melding of art and journalism I’ve seen online. Beyond that, it’s inspired me to rethink what’s possible. Kudos to the team that created this wonder.